Employment

I’m looking for a job … for a deaf person in Cape Town

Monday, July 9th, 2012 | Miscelaneous | Comments Off

Jimmy Daniels is a 30 year old black man who is deaf from birth.  When I managed the Khanya project we employed him as a messenger (seven years ago), but soon discovered that he was capable of much more.  Within a short while he became computer literate and he was then used to do data capturing and to perform other office duties.  As his technology skills increased, he became responsible for reproduction of CDs and DVDs for education institutions.  He also handled filing, mailing of materials to 1 400 schools, and was always willing to accept any task assigned to him.

Jimmy Daniels

He is honest, reliable and once he understands what must be done, hardly ever makes a mistake.  Being deaf, he is not distracted at all by office chatter and so he remains focused on his job.  He is a good lip reader and can use his voice to some extent, so communicating with him is not much of a problem.

When Khanya came to an end in March 2012, Jimmy became unemployed.  If you are in the Cape Town area and have a vacancy for him, please contact me.  You’ll have a solid worker on whom you can depend.

Tags:

Will technology make teachers redundant?

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010 | technology, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

The prospect of losing your job can cause much anxiety.  When you see people around you being retrenched it is natural to be concerned about your own job security.

Teachers are not immune to layoffs.  When the government cuts budgets and there is talk about teachers being “in excess” and terms such as reorganization, downsizing and rationalization appear in the papers, panic sets in.

It is only natural that teachers wonder how the introduction of technology in schools could impact on their prospects of continued employment.  They may think back to the time of the industrial revolution – many mine workers and factory workers lost their jobs when machines were used for functions previously performed by the workers.

“Won’t computers take over my job?” some teachers may ask.

The answer to this question is an emphatic “no”.  Machines can take over manual repetitive tasks.  But they can not perform those tasks requiring higher order thinking – and teaching is possibly one of the most complex activities on earth.  Teachers are working with the minds of learners, shaping them, while trying to find the best teaching technique to match the learning style of each one of their learners.

You can use computers and related tools without any fear of redundancy.  When a carpenter replaces a manual saw with an electric one, does that make the human redundant?  Of course not – but it does make the carpenter more productive.  The same principle applies when technology becomes available in a school.

Don’t fear!  Digital tools in your classroom will never make you redundant.  A creative, intelligent teacher is needed to plan lessons – a piece of equipment can’t do this!  And what good will electronic tools do without a teacher when the power goes off?

Technology may bring unexpected advantages to you if you do face job insecurity.  If you become proficient in its use, you will be more marketable.  The high cost of training a teacher to become a skilled technology practitioner benefits you in two ways: when the school is firing, you are unlikely to be the one to go owing to the investment made in you, and when a school is hiring, it will be a bargain to employ you since you won’t need expensive training.

During economically uncertain times technology can be your best friend – treat it as such by learning to work with it.

While there are learners, teachers will never be redundant

Tags: , ,

Will interactive whiteboards make teachers redundant?

Sunday, January 31st, 2010 | Employment, IWBs | 3 Comments

The prospect of losing your job can cause much anxiety.  When you see people around you being retrenched it is natural to be concerned about your own job security.

Teachers are not immune to layoffs.  When the government cuts budgets and there is talk about teachers being “in excess” and terms such as reorganization, downsizing and rationalization appear in the papers, panic sets in.

It is only natural that teachers wonder how the introduction of technology in schools could impact on their prospects of continued employment.  They may think back to the time of the industrial revolution – many mine workers and factory workers lost their jobs when machines were used for functions that they had performed before.

“Won’t computers take over my job?” some teachers may ask.

The answer to this question is an emphatic “no”.  Machines can take over manual repetitive tasks.  But it can not replace those tasks requiring higher order thinking – and teaching is possibly one of the most complex activities on earth.  Teachers are working with the minds of learners, shaping them, while trying to find the best teaching technique to match the learning style of each one of their learners.

You can use computers and related tools without any fear of redundancy.  When a carpenter replaces a manual saw with an electric one, does that make the human redundant?  Of course not – but it does make the carpenter more productive.  The same principle applies when technology becomes available in a school.

Don’t fear!  An interactive whiteboard in your classroom will never make you redundant.  The board needs you to operate it.

An interactive whiteboard may bring unexpected advantages to you when you face job insecurity.  If you become proficient in its use, you will be more marketable.  The high cost of training a teacher to become a skilled interactive classroom practitioner benefits you in two ways: when the school is firing, you are unlikely to be the one to go owing to the investment made in you, and when a school is hiring, it will be a bargain to employ you since you won’t need expensive training.

Your interactive whiteboard can be your best friend during economic uncertain times – treat it as such be getting to know it intimately.

Click here for more information about interactive whiteboards.

Tags: ,

Once I’ve become an experienced laptop user, could this lead to a career change?

Sunday, April 26th, 2009 | Employment, laptops | Comments Off

When you are an experienced laptop user, you will be able to:

Once you are able to use your laptop for all these things, you will be regarded as a good computer user.  But this does not make you a computer expert.  Only some teachers – those with an aptitude for technology and who are willing to work night and day – will move beyond this level to a point where they could consider changing careers from teaching to computing.

The reason why you are getting – or given – a laptop is not to get you out of teaching, but to empower you to become a better teacher.

Ask yourself: “Where does my passion lie?  If it is with teaching, then stick with it; if you want to get out of teaching, the field of technology is a good option.

Two roads overcame the hyena,” is an African proverb.  This saying has its origin in the legend of a hyena and may give you some food for thought.

A very hungry hyena went out on the Tanzanian plains to hunt for food. He came to a branch in the bush road where the two paths veered off in different directions. He saw two goats caught in the thickets at the far end of the two different paths. With his mouth watering in anticipation, he decided that his left leg would follow the left path and his right leg the right path. As the two paths continued to veer in different directions he tried to follow them both at once. Finally he split in two.

The moral of the story?  Make up your mind what you want to do.  Decide why you want to become an experienced laptop user – to be a better teacher or to change your career.

Which road will you take?

Click here to find answers to more laptop related questions.

Tags: ,

How to be safe when layoffs take place

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009 | Employment | 3 Comments

Every day or two we are informed of yet another wave of retrenchments.

In many instances layoffs are done indiscriminately.  For example, when a company closes down, everyone in the organization is without a job.  However, sometimes arbitrary rules are applied to determine who will be retrenched, such as the LIFO principle – the last ones in will be the first to be out.  Some companies may also use a downsizing situation as an opportunity to move closer to their employment equity targets.

In the current economic climate nobody has absolute job security. Even people employed by the state, or contracted to state-run projects, could be affected when cut-backs are considered.

Layoffs are sad for the victims and their families, but may present a good opening for an organization to get rid of its dead wood. 

Dead wood is defined as “people in a group or organization who are not useful any more and who need to be removed”.  During an economic squeeze, organizations can no longer afford to carry dead wood, even if it was tolerated during more prosperous times.  If staff members have to go, it makes sense to let go of the useless ones and retain the useful ones.

Successful organizations will allow the get-rid-of-the-dead-wood rule to guide their downsizing strategies, rather than directives such as LIFO and EE.

Employees who treasure their jobs want to ensure that they are not regarded as dead wood – they must go out of their way to prove that they are valued fruit-bearing branches of their trees. This may just save them from the pruning knife of the retrencher.

Tags:

Winner - Education Blog

Follow me on Twitter

Search

Blogroll

A calender of all posts to date

October 2014
S M T W T F S
« May    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031